Career Advancement

Dental DSO Companies, Private Practice, or Corporate Dental – Which One Is Right for You?

Career Advancement

Dental DSO Companies, Private Practice, or Corporate Dental – Which One Is Right for You?

A dentist speaks with a pediatric patient at a practice managed by a dental DSO company.

As you begin a dental job search, there are many things to consider. Perhaps the most important and one of the most complicated to answer is what type of practice you’ll work for. We’ve broken down some of the pros and cons to the three main practice models to help you decide whether corporate dental, private practices, or dental DSO companies are your best match.

Dental DSO Companies, Private Practices, and Corporate Dental: The Basics

These are the three main categories of practice types in the dental world. It’s important to know the basics of how each one works.

Private Practice

Private practice is perhaps the best-known dental business model and what most people view as the “traditional” path for dentists. A private practice is owned by the dentist. That does not mean all private practices are small or low volume. Private practices come in a variety of sizes and may see thousands of patients. Private practices may also have multiple locations and multiple associate dentists or partners.

An orthodontist shows a patient her options for braces at her practice managed by a dental DSO company.

Dental Support Organization

Dental DSO companies help offload some of the administrative burden of a practice. A dental service organization typically assists with managing the business aspects of a practice. This model can apply to a variety of situations. For example, a practice may contract with a DSO for management support, or a group of dentists may come together to form a DSO and retain ownership of their practices. Ideally, a well-run DSO should free dentists to focus on patients rather than administrative tasks.

Corporate Dentistry

Corporate dentistry can fall under “DSO” as an umbrella term. However, leadership is flipped on its head in this version. Corporate dentistry typically describes a situation where nonclinical investors (non-dentists) buy many practices and retain operational control. Legally, a dentist still has to “own” each practice, but in a corporate dental setting, the doctors are beholden to the business side, rather than the other way around. The largest corporate entities in the dental industry are well-known, and sometimes a little notorious. Most of these are owned by private equity firms.

Potential for Growth

Career longevity can mean something different to each dentist. Some envision the slow-and-steady path, favoring consistency and routine, where others see themselves learning new techniques, increasing speed, and incorporating every new piece of technology as it arrives. It’s up to you to determine what will be satisfying in the long term.

Private Practice

Entering into private practice usually means starting as an associate and working from five to ten years for another dentist. In some cases, working as an associate is a stepping stone to building your own practice. In others, your employer may plan to sell the practice to you when they are ready to retire. However, that “when” can be a very long wait, and ultimately it’s something you have no control over. When you join a private practice as a new dentist, you may find there are not enough patients to fill your schedule. This situation can drag on for months or years, depending on how motivated the owner is to attract new patients.

Practice ownership can be incredibly rewarding, but it also comes with a ton of headaches. It can mean late nights and early mornings, stressing over payroll and fighting insurance companies. Or, it can mean millions in debt to get started, then praying you can retain enough patients to stay afloat. Private practice has the potential for tremendous rewards, but it demands a lot of risk. And while you’re working to grow your practice, you may find your personal growth has to take a back seat.

A dentist and hygienist speak with a pediatric patient while his family looks on.

Dental Support Organization

This is one area where dental DSO companies can be a real blessing, especially for first-year dentists. Because DSO practices generally have higher volume, they can ensure incoming dentists hit the ground running with plenty of patients. Partnering with a DSO may also give you opportunities to learn new techniques and expand your practice over time. Even better, depending on the DSO and/or specialty, you’re unlikely to be on the hook for purchasing or maintaining new equipment.

We’ll take care of day-to-day operations like payroll, scheduling, recruiting, and dealing with suppliers, leaving you free to focus on what really matters to you: your work as a dentist.

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Corporate Dentistry

A corporate dental setting may seem like a great place for growth as a dentist. After all, you’ll be seeing tons of patients and have every opportunity to learn, right? Unfortunately, this is not the case with all companies. Corporate dentistry typically demands incredibly high volume production. This causes many dentists to find themselves feeling more like a robot than a doctor. Not every corporation is the same, of course, but be sure you evaluate your personal career goals for alignment with their mission and values. Burnout is not good for career growth. Procedural mix is key for growth and an area you should ask about.

Work-Life Balance and Positive Work Environment

Work-life balance and a positive dental office culture are both key to building a satisfying career and avoiding being run down. No matter how much you try not to let outside factors affect your work, your patients’ experience will depend on your state of mind and how smoothly your team works together. Conflict management in dental practices can be difficult, but it’s incredibly important.

Private Practice

Work-life balance is one of the main problems with going into private practice. While some dentists get plenty of vacation time and have two or three associates to take emergency calls while they’re away from the office, this is the exception and not the rule. Most practice owners going it alone find that they are never truly away from work.

In the best-case scenario, one of the advantages of private practice is how close-knit the team can become. Some private practices feel like a family of friends. When the team is smaller, there can be some very deep connections between employees. On the flip side, in a small private practice, it just takes one person with an attitude problem to stir up trouble. And if you’re the practice owner, that means you’re the one everybody will complain to. You will have to help maintain employee morale, manage personnel concerns, and even terminate and rehire staff if it comes down to it.

A dentist and hygienist perform a checkup on a pediatric patient in a practice managed by a dental DSO company.

Dental Support Organization

Practice owners working with the support of a DSO frequently find work-life balance much easier to achieve. Administrative support means leaving things they didn’t teach in dental school to management experts. Most dental DSO companies have systems in place to assist with emergencies while you are away on vacation, so you are able to leave work at work and focus on your loved ones in your time away.

However, working as a DSO practice employee may mean you have less control over your hours than you would as a practice owner. That’s why it’s so important to make sure your priorities align with the dental support organization you work with.

Download our Free Guide to Choosing Your Dental Career! Download Now

Corporate Dentistry

Corporate dental practices do offer much of that same ability to leave work at work. However, the private equity firm in charge may not care much if it’s your kid’s high school graduation or your grandmother’s eightieth birthday. And if you haven’t met production goals, you may be on the hook for some extra hours to make up the difference.

Additionally, the emotional health of many corporate offices tends to be their weakest point. From hygienists to assistants to doctors, there are tons of reports out there of corporate dental employees feeling overworked, micromanaged, and underappreciated. You will have almost no ability to influence the office environment in these practices, as marching orders come from the business side.

A new dentist learns how to work the equipment in her practice with her mentor. New dentists at Community Dental Partners benefit from the mentorship program.

Your Support System

Having a great support system can make all the difference in your career trajectory. Mentors can be especially important for newcomers to the field. Committing to a career in private practice often means going it alone. It means seeking out your own mentors and frequently working without support staff to take some of the burden of running the practice off your shoulders.

While corporate environments sometimes offer support in terms of practice management and scheduling, they don’t tend to truly invest in mentorship or fostering great team dynamics.

While we can’t speak for all dental DSO companies, Community Dental Partners sees our main role in your career trajectory as providing the scaffolding that will allow you to build something remarkable while maintaining your clinical autonomy. For more details on how partnering with CDP can help you achieve your highest potential, download our Guide to Choosing Your Dental Career. Then, schedule a call with a Recruiting Manager!

Dr. Craig Copeland
Dr. Craig Copeland Chief Dental Officer Community Dental Partners

A graduate of Brigham Young University’s Business Finance department and the University of Florida’s College of Dentistry, Dr. Craig Copeland, DMD first joined Community Dental Partners (CDP) in 2010, after co-founder Dr. Chad Evans invited him to an interview.

He instantly fell in love with CDP’s mission to elevate dentistry, make great dental care accessible, and provide unique and amazing experiences for underserved communities. The organization’s culture aligned with his own beliefs and he knew that CDP would offer him the ideal environment in which to grow.

Today, Dr. Copeland is the Chief Dental Officer of Community Dental Partners and focuses on helping CDP’s doctors exceed in their careers, through mentorship, training, and strengthening CDP’s support systems.

Dr. Copeland lives in Texas with his family: his wife and four children. He’s an avid sports fan, and supporting his children in their activities, such as basketball, gymnastics, and soccer, keeps him busy. He also likes to travel to new places with his family whenever he can.

Careers with CDP

Doctor Led.
Team Supported.

You take care of the smiles. We take care of you.

Learn More

Careers with CDP

Doctor Led.
Team Supported.

You take care of the smiles. We take care of you.

Learn More